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RI President Mark Maloney - 2019-20

Mark Maloney - 2019-20 Rotary International President

Mark Daniel Maloney, of the Rotary Club of Decatur, Alabama, USA, is the selection of the Nominating Committee for President of Rotary International for 2019-20. He will be declared the president-nominee on 1 October if no challenging candidates have been suggested.

“The clubs are where Rotary happens,” says Maloney, an attorney. He aims to support and strengthen clubs at the community level, preserve Rotary’s culture as a service-oriented membership organization, and test new regional approaches for growth.

“With the eradication of polio, recognition for Rotary will be great and the opportunities will be many,” he says. “We have the potential to become the global powerhouse for doing good.”

Maloney is a principal in the law firm of Blackburn, Maloney, and Schuppert LLC, with a focus on taxation, estate planning, and agricultural law. He represents large farming operations in the Southeastern and Midwestern United States, and has chaired the American Bar Association’s Committee on Agriculture in the section of taxation. He is a member of the American Bar Association, Alabama State Bar Association, and the Alabama Law Institute.

He has been active in Decatur’s religious community, chairing his church’s finance council and a local Catholic school board. He has also served as president of the Community Foundation of Greater Decatur, chair of Morgan County Meals on Wheels, and director of the United Way of Morgan County and the Decatur-Morgan County Chamber of Commerce.

A Rotarian since 1980, Maloney has served as an RI director; Foundation trustee and vice chair; and aide to 2003-04 RI President Jonathan Majiyagbe. He also has participated in the Council on Legislation as chair, vice chair, parliamentarian, and trainer. He was an adviser to the 2004 Osaka Convention Committee and chaired the 2014 Sydney Convention Committee.

Prior to serving as a district governor, Maloney led a Group Study Exchange to Nigeria.

He also served as Future Vision Committee vice chair; Foundation training institute moderator; Foundation permanent fund national adviser; member of the Peace Centers Committee; and adviser to the Foundation’s Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene in Schools Target Challenge Committee.

Maloney’s wife, Gay, is an attorney in the same law firm, and a member and past president of the Rotary Club of Decatur Daybreak, Alabama, USA. Both Mark and Gay are Paul Harris Fellows, Major Donors, and Bequest Society members.

John Chambers - District Governor (Copied form District 6400 Website)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John became of member of the Rotary Club of Detroit A.M. in 2004.  He has served as President in 2010-2011, Secretary and Foundation chair in various years. He was previously a member of the Rotary Club of Novi. As President of Detroit A.M. he collaborated with the other clubs in area 1 on an Adult Literacy Project.

At  the District Level, he has served on various committees, chaired the District Governor’s Golf Outing and Assistant Governor, Area 1.

John has traveled  twice to Haiti on a medical mission, twice to El Salvador for water/school building, and once to Tanzania for church and Rotary.  He has traveled twice to Nicaragua on a medical/dental mission. In Nicaragua he has visited “the children of the dump”. These missions have had a profound impact on him. John is a Major Donor and member of the Paul Harris Society. He is a recipient of the COG award.

John is a retired Financial Officer from the Court system and Detroit Public Library. He is  a C.P.A. and holds a M.B.A. from University of Detroit. John is currently a board member of the Detroit Public Library Friend Foundation. He serves as Chair of the Oakland County Library Board and Vice President of the Oakland County  Library Friends. In Novi, he has served on the City Council, Library Board, various committees- police/fire, storm water, regional and statewide. He was a volunteer fire fighter and first aid and CPR instructor.

He and his wife, Sandy,  enjoy traveling, golfing, playing with grand children, and church.   John along with Sandy are looking forward to serving Super District 6400.

 

 

 
 
The 4-Way Test
 
 
RI Monthly Themes
August
Membership and New Club Development Month
 
September
Basic Education and Literacy Month
 
October
Economic and Community Development Month
 
November
Rotary Foundation Month
 
December
Disease Prevention and Treatment Month
 
January
Vocational Service Month
 
February
Peace and Conflict Prevention/Resolution Month
 
March 2018
Water and Sanitation MonthApril 2017
Maternal and Child Health Month
 
May
Youth Service Month
 
June
The Rotary Foundation's 100th anniversary
Rotary Fellowships Month
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
STATEMENT OF PURPOSE

The Adrian Noon Rotary Club is a vibrant, fun, and action-oriented club that is growing their membership and financial capability with strong committed members working towards improving the quality of life within the communities we serve.

Nelson Douglass - Club President

 
Club Information

Welcome to our Club!

Adrian

Service Above Self

We meet Thursdays at 12:00 PM
The Center
Corner of Wolf Creek Hwy and US223
Adrian, MI  49221
United States of America
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Thanks to everyone who participated today as several committee chairs met with their respective committees and discussed their specific responsibilities as well as other programs we should be involved in. Committees that met were: Community Service, Membership and International.

Those gathering to discuss “Community Service” suggested that: we participate as a club in various holiday parades so that we can promote our club, look at doing something again in partnership with the Boys & Girls Club, possibly participate in the Walk to End Alzheimer’s with members who participate in the walk wearing their Rotary shirts, possible project with Hospice of Lenawee, involvement in the Appleumpkin Festival and pitching the Rotary tent as a possible fundraiser, participate in Chamber Expo to promote our club as well as Associated Charites and Salvation Army events. The committee rounded out their discussion suggesting we think of more programs we can do as a club involving veterans.

Chip reported out what the “International Service Committee” discussed which included programs to deal with the current immigration problems particularly in Mexico and the Central America region where we could donate clothes, books, etc. Since there will also be 15 international students coming here to attend Adrian High School, this will give our club an opportunity to interact with them somehow that we’ll want to look into. It might even include a social gathering with them so we can show them what we do as a club. Another suggestion was to connect with the international students at Adrian College and Siena Heights University. The committee suggested another idea they had might be to have a program to raise money to purchase bicycles for people in countries that need them in Africa. Another idea was to schedule an international dinner.

Last to report out was “Membership Committee” chair, Mike Tobey, who said that a “cocktail hour” (every quarter) possible at the Adrian Armory that would be advertised in advance through various media outlets. Retention, Mike said, was also discussed and that he hoped his committee could get a list every week of members who attend our meetings regularly and those who don’t so they could be called and encouraged to continue attending again through a simple phone call, email, etc.

Thanks everyone for you input and participation!
District 6400’s Assistant Governor graced us with her presence today to induct the newest member of the Adrian Noon Rotary Club – Matt Swartzlander. Matt is s former member of our club and the Executive Director of the Adrian Area Chamber of Commerce. Former past president and club member, Dennis Swartzlander, is Matt's uncle. We promised not to hold that against him!!
 
During Marilyn’s remarks she emphasized the facts that Matt was joining THE oldest service club in the world with 1.5 million other members who work hard to build water wells, schools, infrastructure, etc. Rotary is not just work, she said. It is also fellowship and fun. His sponsor, Immediate Past President Kathye did the honors of placing his new Rotary lapel pin on him. Congrats, Matt, and welcome to our club!
Fallon Bull, the Program Director of the Hope center said that the organization was formed 42 years ago to meet the needs of adults with developmental disabilities. One hundred different members are served each week to participate in their structured programming, she said. Those served, if they choose not to participate in a program can “hang out on the computer or talk a walk, or travel to various non-profits to do odd jobs there.” Fallon said. Hope has a garden that produces vegetables that are donated to local pantries and soup kitchens. Jerry said he especially likes to play pool and has helped pack snacks that members share in throughout the day.
 
After hour programs include their Hoopster Basketball Team where members can play some 20 games per season. Members go to Mud Hens and Pistons games, she said, in addition to Hidden Lake Gardens, etc. to “provide them with experiences they would not otherwise have”. At Hope there are various Job Teams that members can engage in to teach them responsibility. Jerry said he goes out and gets the mail and paper each day. Job Teams also give members the opportunity to talk and socialize with others which is so very important to a person’s development, Fallon said. “Members need to feel they have a purpose and are valued”, she said.
 
Mary Martin, Developmental Director at Hope, spoke a little more about the history of the center which began as a “walk in” center and grew to what it is today. Civitan of Adrian raised over $1M in 1988 to build the very facility they occupy today, she said. Mary provided statistics about their members and they are prone to being victims of crime and why it was important to teach them at Hope what to do to prevent that and how to take control of their lives including nutrition, participating in life-long learning activities, etc. “Hope provides a reason for people to get up and put each day”.
 
Mary finished by announcing their big fundraiser – A NIGHT FOR HOPE event – Friday, November 8th from 6pm-8:30pm
This was Nelson’s very first meeting as the new president of the Adrian Noon Rotary Club! Congrats, Nelson. It’s going to be a great year! He took this opportunity to thanks Immediate Past President, Kathye, for a tremendously successful year and everything she, the board and fellow members were able to accomplish. Nelson gave a rundown of each of the 13 standing committees His summary and the programs each committee will be responsible for is as follows:
 
Adrian Rotary Foundation; Club Service Committee; Community Service Committee - Programs responsible for: River Raisin Cleanup – September; Salvation Army Kettle Drive – December; Lenawee Bike Tour – September; Christmas Wreath Sale – December; Comstock Park Christmas Walk – December; Onion Sales – May; ERaceStigma 5k Run; Great Lakes Woodworking Festival – May; International Service Committee; Membership Committee - Programs responsible for: ; Fireside Chats (2-3 per year); Luncheon with former members of the club – October 24; New Member Brochure Revisions (Annually); Program Committee - Programs responsible for:  Monopoly Game Project (Funds to go to 100th Anniversary Celebration); Christmas Club Social – December; Other Club Socials (2-3 per year); Junior Rotarian Day – May; Public Relations Committee; RI Foundation; Rotaract Committee; Scholarship Awards Committee - The charge of the Scholarship Committee will continue to oversee the annual 4-Way Test, Bob Brady and to ensure the timely and fair disposition of scholarship funds; Vocational Service Committee - Programs responsible for: Launch Lenawee Mentor Program; Networking Event (aka – Art of Mingling) – February; Youth Services Committee - Programs responsible for:  Fluency Friends - September – May; R.Y.L.A. Conference – November.
 
Nelson closed by encouraging all members, if they have not already done so, to join a committee.
PDG Sue Goldsen officially introduced our speaker today, Steve Ahles, who is past president of the Southgate Rotary Club and will be District 6400’s Membership Chair in 2019-20. The committee exists, Steve said, to “help strengthen Rotary”.
 
Steve spoke about membership flexibility – “the most important aspect of everything we do”, he said. Finding and engaging members makes everything we do easier. Talk to people about the things we do as a club. Always talk Rotary, he said. Do it at family gatherings, parties, meeting, etc. “You never know where you’re going to get your next member”. “You just need to ask”. Keep a list of who potential members are via their contact info, Steve said. And, be sure and follow up with them once you make the initial contact. Don’t overlook obvious people like spouses, former members and past Youth Exchange participants either.
 
Also, make a list of the most important things (i.e. FAQ – Frequently Asked Questions) about your club, Steve said, so you can talk to potential members about what is important to us. List things like our dues structure, our expectations for new members like meeting attendance and program participation, how many members we have, members who stand out, etc. This is information that will enhance the prospect of people joining our club, he said, because they really don’t know what we do. This could even be emailed to them, Steve suggested. “It gives prospects a factual base from which to work from”. An example, Steve said, is available from a fellow Rotarian who originally formulated it that he would be happy to share.
 
Steve said he originally joined Rotary because he “wanted to make a difference in peoples’ lives.” Remind prospects that in Rotary we Join Leaders, Exchange Ideas, Take Action – it is our motto, he said. Know your strengths. If prospects that have want something you can’t offer, he said, direct them to another club in the area. “This has paybacks”.
 
When you get a new member, he said, be sure and celebrate it. Make sure that person feels welcome in our club and is appreciated. At his club’s meeting, he said, we periods during the meeting called MOM’s presentations – Meet Our Members – that give new members an opportunity to tell others about themselves. He said that in a past issue of The Rotarian Magazine he saw the idea to post new member pictures on a poster board along with a bit of info on each person.
 
Be persistent, Steve said. One or two times when you ask a prospect isn’t really enough, Steve said. Your club might not be a priority to them at that time because everyone is busy so keep asking when you think the time is right. “But, don’t let them fall through the cracks”. Think outside the box. Steve said that he asked a friend who was not a Rotarian to attend a District Convention with him and after that he joined! Whatever works for you.
 
Clubs lose members, it’s inevitable, he said. So, be constantly recruiting. “You’re either growing or dying as a club”, he said. There is no other way to think about it. Steve said that he keeps a “Friends of Rotary” list that he constantly refers to in order to identify prospects who might want to join. Steve said he asks them on occasion to help out with various club projects in an effort to get them to join. “Stay connected”.
 
Steve said that when we talk about “vibrant clubs”, we need to reflect on what clubs actually do. It important to do a club health check, he said. “Sit down at the start of your new Rotary year and do a club health check with your members at the next Club Assembly. Assess all aspects of what you do from your meeting room to all your projects. ”If you want to be a vibrant club make sure you know how you appear to new members. Think of all members as your customers”. “Make things comfortable and exciting for them. Get their feedback”.
 
Offer different types of membership if you can”, Steve said – business memberships, family memberships, senior memberships, etc. They allow others to help clubs out, he said.  Steve said that his club belongs to the local Chamber of Commerce. It allows club members to interact with Chamber members.
 
One of the questions Steve was asked was about retention and the fact that members in North America were leaving at a faster rate than new members coming in! It’s critical, Steve said, that we do what we have to as a club to keep the members we have.
 
Thanks, Steve, for your time and some great suggestions.
Maher Mualla from the Adrian Morning Club was on hand at our meeting today and bought with him Deangelo from the local Habitat for Humanity (Community Outreach Director) along with Isaiah and Bushra representing AmeriCorps who had been assisting Habitat with home restorations in the area.  Bushra, who is from the Detroit area, and Isaiah who lives in Baltimore, shared their experiences with us while they have been working in Adrian. Most recently, they said, they had been working on property in Adrian on Church Street in conjunction with the local Habitat for Humanity.
 
AmeriCorps VISTA (Volunteers in Service to America) members bring passion and perseverance where the need is greatest: to organizations that help eradicate poverty. AmeriCorps members serve as a catalyst for change, living and working alongside community members to meet our nation’s most pressing challenges and advance local solutions.
 
Since 1965, over 220,000 VISTA members have served with the mission to strengthen organizations that alleviate poverty. VISTA serves in each of the 50 U.S. States and in all U.S. Territories. VISTA members go where they are needed and make a difference through volunteering and the mobilization of resources.
 
They said that volunteers can spend one year serving full-time and make a difference at home. AmeriCorps, they said, is a unique opportunity to improve their own lives and the lives of fellow Americans. From Alaska to Puerto Rico, AmeriCorps VISTA members are building capacity, strengthening communities, and developing their careers. Isaiah also mentioned that volunteers also qualify for a scholarship by volunteering.
As they complete their assignment here in Adrian, they suspected they would be traveling to Florida soon to assist in projects there.
Here is the script of Bill's presentation: My name is Bill Morrison with the Plymouth Rotary Club and I am here today to share with you my observances of, and involvement in, entertainment involving the Adrian Rotary Club at District Conferences.  The Adrian Club events I will show today are all more than 30 years old, and it’s possible you more senior men may have participated in them.  I say men because Rotary hadn’t yet realized the value ladies could bring to the clubs.  I joined the Plymouth Rotary club in 1979 when Adrian and Plymouth had only one club each and we were in District 640 which didn’t become district 6400 until 12 years later.  Both the clubs had around 125 members and were among the more active and respected clubs in the district. My first District Conference was Governor Frank Sladen’s conference, held in Kalamazoo in 1980. It was so much fun that Barb and I attended 25 more.  In my short time in Rotary I had heard a lot about what a great club Adrian was and about your famous bi-annual variety show, which I never had the pleasure of attending.  I pictured Adrian, like Plymouth, as a very distinguished group of service oriented men and I was elated to find out that the conference was going to present one of the skits from your show that year.
 
This was my first real introduction to the Adrian Rotary Club.   It took me a few years and some intensive therapy to recover from the shock.
At least I was somewhat prepared for what was to come 4 years later when Governor Sandy Sandrock asked Bill Chase and I to co-chair the entertainment committee for his upcoming Conference at the Sofitel Hotel in Toledo Ohio.  Sandy knew I was a magician and he wanted me to produce a district talent review for the first half of the show and he wanted Bill to bring in the cast of the Adrian show which that year featured the Miss America Pageant.  Bill got busy collaring all the Adrian cast members, which was like pulling teeth, which Bill was certainly qualified to do.  Everything was falling into place when, about 2 weeks out from the show, I received a call from Bill saying Adrian wouldn’t be able to do their part of the show because two of the key players couldn’t make it. 
 
 I suggested that the parts couldn’t be all that hard and he should get some subs from the district to fill out the cast and I suggested he call Frank Sladen and Neil Ballheim.  Bill was somewhat appalled at asking such prestigious members and wasn’t sure what kind of response he would get.
 
I need to digress here.  Neal Ballheim was a Funeral Director and for those of you who never knew him, Frank Sladen, from the Grosse Pointe club, was a past district governor, a disabled veteran who lost a leg in WWII, a bookstore owner and the past headmaster of Grosse Point Liggett School.  He went on to serve as a director in both Rotary International and the RI Foundation.  He was A VERY distinguished and somewhat serious man who was loved and looked up to by all who knew him. When they both accepted it showed us how Rotarians can step up to the plate, no matter what the obstacles may be (or what it may do to their reputation.)
 
Having Frank and Neal on board was the icing on the cake since very few Rotarians in the district knew the Adrian members in the show, but they all knew Frank and NeiI. So, Neal became Miss Alaska and Frank became Miss Washington and the cast was complete.   As they were introduced and walked through the room Neal was kissing the heads of bald men and sitting on men’s laps, and most everyone recognized him.  Frank, on the other hand, stayed in character and most people didn’t have a clue who he was, which you will see from the reaction when the cast is introduced at the end of the program. Here is Master of Ceremonies Bill Chase to introduce the program.
 
I feel it is only fair, since I have made fun of your show to admit that many years later, at the Grand Hotel I entered Plymouth in a club talent contest.  I wasn’t sure we could win, so I lowered myself to your level.  Here are my magician’s assistants from the Plymouth club:  Tom Kennedy and Past District Governor Ed Schulz.  Because of them we won the contest.  No one remembers or cares what I did, but they all remember my beautiful assistants.
 
Bill and I remained good friends and 5 years later had a chance to work together again.  Governor Carl Riegal asked me to handle the Saturday Night entertainment for his conference at the Grand Traverse Resort.  I especially wanted to use Bill in the show because he was the incoming Governor.  I was able to put together a large show with various Rotary talent and the stellar MC was Paul Sincock from Plymouth, who you all know as our current district governor.  I do need to set this video up for you.  I had just finished sawing one of the Japanese Exchange students in half and was getting ready for the next trick when I was approached by Paul and past district governor Al Lapshan, who was the police chief of Allen Park.  Al told me of the new rule for magician’s assistants that required us to give equal time to men.  I needed a quick replacement and saw Bill in the front row.  The audience joined me in prodding Bill to help me.  I told him he wasn’t dressed properly and sent him behind a curtain where I had stashed several different outfits and told him to pick a costume and try it on.  That bit of fantasy sets you up for what follows. 
 
We had snuck Chuck and Linda in the day before and most of the Rotarians in attendance didn’t know Bill had a Twin Brother and those that did had no idea he was there.   I hope I have brought back a few repressed memories and opened the minds of everyone else. For my part, all I can say is THANKS FOR THE MEMORIES.
Cindy Kojima, retired in 2017 from the LISD after 34 years in education there, spoke to the club today and brought with her, Hachi, Masahiro’s pet to talk about Therapy Dogs. Hachi is a 7-year old Pembroke Welsh Corgi. Hachi is an official Theray Dog licensed through the Alliance of Therapy Dogs headquartered in Cheyene, Wyoming. To qualify, Hachi had to pass three tests in a medical care facility.
 
Hachi’s first visit as an official Therapy dog was on Valentine’s Day in 2018 at the Lenawee Care Medical facility. Then it was on to the schools in the area. The first was in April of 2018 at Michener Elementary, Cindy said, and with first and second graders. Cindi said she decided to begin Therapy Dog volunteering to help people and keep Hachi “socialized”. Therapy sessions, Cindy said, usually last between 5 and 10 minutes with individuals.
 

About ATD (from their website): ATD provides testing, certification, registration, support, and insurance for members who volunteer with dogs to visit hospitals, special needs centers, schools, nursing homes, and other facilities. We’re a network of caring volunteers who are willing to share our special canines to bring smiles and joy to people, young and old alike. Whether you and your dog are looking to become a certified therapy team or your facility would like to start a therapy dog program, Alliance of Therapy Dogs (ATD) is your #1 choice for pet therapy.

Dawn Harkey, owner of this business since 1986, gave members a number of great trips the next time they travel. She highly suggested that anyone who travels abroad should purchase health insurance since, unknown to many of us, our health provider cannot insure us when we need medical attention. Dawn said that she has experience with a company called TravelGuard should people be traveling overseas.
 
Dawn next suggested that when we travel, “we go with the flow” and to let their banks and credit card companies know when they are traveling abroad. She suggested that if we travel to European countries, be sure and take wash cloths since they are not provided in hotels there. Also, be sure and take a number of Zip Lock bags to pit dirty clothes in. To save money on bottled water when you travel. Dawn said to take an empty water bottle you can fill once you are over there and save money on otherwise expensive water.
 
Dawn also suggested you save the plastic bags newspapers typically come in so that in the event you have muddy shoes, you can simply place them in these bags. Be sure and have rain ponchos with you when you travel, she said, that you can purchase at Dollar Stores. Always take a photo on your phone of your passport, she said, and be sure and take with you your phone charger with adapters for outlets overseas.
 
Always keep your medications on you when you travel, she said. Money belts are good for this. Lastly, she suggested that if you are traveling with a partner to be sure and mix the cloths of each in bags in the event one’s bags get lost during the trip and this way they will both still have clothes to wear.
 
The top destinations around the world, Dawn said were: Iceland, Alaska, South American countries and that Mexico trips were the best value. She suggested that travelers avoid countries like Venezuela and the Middle East. The Holy City, Dawn said, was still a popular destination and would cost approximately $5,000 per person to travel there.
Kathye, Nate, Nelson and Yours Truly [resented the program today and took the training program used to orient new members and narrowed it down to about 25% of the typical presentation and shared the information with members today.
 
Kathye addressed the topic of “What is Rotary” explaining that it is an organization – Join Leaders, Exchange Ideas and Take Action. She spoke about the elevator speech which the PR Committee was still working on and shared one that the district had developed when she attended the PETS training. She then spoke about how Rotary began in 1905 by founder. Rotary got its name, she said, from rotating from one location to the next to meet. Kathye concluded her presentation by saying that Rotary is 1.2 million members strong across 200 countries and 38,000 clubs. One of their first projects was to provide toilets in downtown Chicago.
 
Nate took the podium next to talk about what the many benefits were to being a Rotarian: Making  difference in peoples’ lives, developing skills that can be applied to one’s career, and networking with other professionals, gives purpose to our lives among others.  The official Rotary Motto, Nate said was SERVICE ABOVE SELF and coined in 1089. The Object of Rotary, he said was to encourage and foster the ideals of service as the basis of worthy enterprise. He went on to say that Rotary’s “Object” is implemented through RI’s five Avenues of Service: Club Service - Community Service – Vocational Service – International Service – Youth Services. Nate showed the breakdown of these and other committees and the members who serve on each and requested this be sent to each member.
 
PE Nelson stepped up next to speak about The 4-Way Test which was developed by Rotarian Herbert J. Taylor in 1932 which is every member’s yardstick to measure one’s level of integrity and ethical standards, he said. He then spoke about we, as Rotarians, are all about including: Digging wells to provide fresh drinking water around the world, Vaccinating children against polio; Restoring eyesight, Build housing, and Educating children among many others. Nelson reported that our club has 59 members currently and we are among 49 other clubs within District 6400 with Paul Sincock as our current District Governor. Next year’s Governor will be John Chambers whose theme will be “Do the Right Thing”. Nelson reminded members that we will celebrate our 100th anniversary as a club in April of 2021. He went over the standard requirements of all Rotarians including attending meetings, joining a committee, paying dues on time, etc.
 
Yours Truly spoke last and briefly mentioned the dues structure which appears at the bottom of the formal application in the club brochure for prospects the different sites that we use to post club information. They include our club website at www.adrianrotary.org, RI’s website at www.myrotary.org on which club presidents announce their goals for the coming year and track progress and where members can create their own username and password and sign up to have donations to the RI Foundation deducted automatically. Also mentioned was the district website at www.district6400.org, and lastly our club’s official Facebook page at www.facebook.com/adriannoonrotaryclub. Our club tracks membership and creates our weekly bulletin using Clubrunner as opposed to DaCdb which other clubs in the district use.
As you'll recall, we did not have  a regular meeting on May 2nd as we joined the Kiwanis Club at their meeting on May 1st at the Center and participated in a very special presentation of Cradle to Career spearheaded by Nate Hamblin and Andrew Munson. Last week was the annual Junior Rotarian Day and 6 of our past Junior Rotarians did a fine job of handling all aspects of our meeting. During the meeting President Kathye presented Elizabeth Huffman with a $1,000 scholarship! 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
General Manager of the newly remodeled Chaloner & Company and Chaloner’s Cigar House, Laura Wanke gave members a wonderful update on the new facility and what it means for Adrian. “Chaloner’s was the oldest and longest operating retail store in Michigan run by the Chaloner family until about the mid 70’s”, she said. Dave Pilmore and Scott Westfall purchased the business in 2015 from Dwayne and Carol Flint to essentially “revitalize downtown Adrian”.
 
The newly renovated building consists of 3 floors: first level – 300 square foot walk-in humidor with over 1,000 cigars priced from $2.50 to $112.50! Downstairs in their basement, she said, is yet another walk-in humidor that allows them to age a stock of other numerous cigars in house.
 
2nd floor – For 21 year olds and older only. You can smoke cigars on that floor but not cigarettes. It is replete with a full service bar consisting of cocktails, beer (4 local rotating selections from Michigan), wine (70 different selections by the bottle) and soft drinks.
 
3rd floor – On this floor is the Member’s Lounge with 130 lockers serving as individual humidors that "were all sold out within two days of opening", she said, complete with a vintage 1918 Brunswick pool table originally owned by Bob Westfall, Scott’s grandfather which was fully refurbished. Also on this floor is an atrium with waterfall and live plants which is the only area on the floor that is non-smoking.
 
Fifty percent of their clientele, she said, are not cigar smokers. "They just come for the environment and good conversation and enjoy a drink or two". Half of their overall customers, Laura said, are women and the other half men.
 
They are open 7 days a week. On Mondays through Thursdays they are open from 11am to 11pm; Fridays and Saturdays from 11 am to midnight; Sundays – from 11am to 7pm. “The owners will never get a return on this project”, she said, “but the goal of this was to bring people in from outside this community so they can see the potential of this community and patronize other businesses and possibly spur them to invest in this community!” They also want to be the best cigar lounge in the country!"
 
The Copper House Coffee Company, their sister company next door, Laura said, is slated to open soon and owned by the Cotton family of Adrian.
It was great to see Past District Governor, Rick Caron, today and to hear his update on the project that has been near and dear to his heart - Legacy project in Tanzania through the Windsor 1918 Rotary Club. In Tanzania, Rick said, was a project to build a Learning Center to which our club donated $500 and Rick thanked us for. Tanzania is located on the east coast of Africa and the home, Rick was adamant about – the home of Mt. Kilimanjaro, not Kenya!

Rick spoke about, Dorcas, a student he and his wife have been supporting in Tanzania who was also present at the opening ceremonies at the new center. The real goal, he said, of his involvement in the Learning Center was “education” and particularly of “vulnerable young women” which broadened to young men over time as well. He went on to speak about the many successes he’s witnessed at the center.

He spoke about Mary who was a friend of his daughter, Julie, who had lost her husband and had two children one of which was Dorcas. Mary became aware of children in the area who had no parents and began taking them in. Eventually her dream was to have a facility that could house, love on, educate and feed children like these. Rick said his daughter returned to the states in 2009 and told him something needed to be done. They have been assisting ever since, he said. Shortly after her return, they were told Mary had died but that her brother, Timothy, continued to “carry on Mary’s vision”.

As soon as he became an NGO (Non-Government Organization) and with a board of directors, Rick told him they could continue to help which he did. Timothy, Rick said, soon became a member and eventually president of the club which eventually qualified the club for international grants that helped with the construction of the new Learning Center!

Rick went on to share the many success stories of students who have been able to attend the Center like Nima who was pregnant and then became a nurse thanks to the Learning Center; Oscar whose job was on the farm but who loved to learn and would sneak into the school and sit under desks because he couldn’t afford the fees and later passed an exam to qualify him to enter a secondary school! From there he entered medical school.

Another success story, Rick said, was Eva – and another product of the Learning Center who dropped out of school at age 17 to get married but because Timothy heard about he situation, is now a pharmaceutical technician; Patrick who also wants to become a doctor; JR (aka Junior Rick and “The Little Professor”) is actually named after Rick; Shedraq – a student Rick’s son is sponsoring needed an education to join the army so attended the center and soon had desires to become a mechanic; Marta – now in her second year studying business administration. “This school”, Rick said, “gives people a chance to excel and everyone improves with education”.

Rick also mentioned that Noel Jackson (PGN) and his wife are also supporting children in Tanzania and closed by showing us pictures of other children who were attending the Learning Center whose lives have been changed thanks to Rotary and the vision of Rick and his daughter, Julie! Always great seeing you, Rick. Keep up the wonderful work!

Should anyone wish to contribute to this great cause, he said, can contact PDG David Carpenter through the District 6400 website.
Pi took to the podium first to tell us three projects the center is working on. One was the Empty Bowls Project which will benefit the Daily Bread. Pi displayed a number of bowls prior to our meeting and some members purchased them. All bowls were made at the Art Center, she said, and are dishwasher and microwave safe and were made without any lead.

Another one of their programs, Pi said, was called Side-By-Side which is a program that assists local Art teachers and their students who excel in this area. This program pairs high school art students who have been identified by their Art teachers as their number one student who would then come to the Art Center in the fall to work with one of their resident artists to work on and complete various projects while they are there. There were 7 students who participated this year and they hope to have ten participate next year, she said. All art was officially exhibited and it was juried and the one selected as THE best was awarded $250 donated by Meijer. The winner was honored as being designated the Number One Art Student in Lenawee County – who Pi brought with her today – Alisa Lopez from Britton High School.

Alisa, who will be attending Siena Heights this fall majoring in Art and Psychology, spoke to the audience about the experience. She said she was grateful to have been part of this program and especially to have been chosen as the #1 art student in Lenawee County and to have met so many other art students who were as passionate about art as she was. Laura VanCamp was her mentor for the past six months. Prior to entering the program, Alisa said that her artwork involved painting.

This experience allowed her to engage in sculpture which, she said, she really enjoyed. During the program she made three sculptures – a bird person, a totem, and a lion mermaid sitting in a bathtub! Alisa said she was particularly proud of her accomplishments since she had no prior training or experience in sculpture. Alisa said she would like to become an Art Therapist following graduation from SHU.

Pi returned to the podium to talk about the third project the Art Center was working on which was a program in conjunction with Hospice of Lenawee this coming fall that would memorialize those who have passed. Doors will be used on which art will be done by local artists commemorating what deceased members of our community will be remembered for which will be aptly titled – The Power of Passage – coined by Anne herself, Pi said.

Pi concluded her presentation by bringing members up-to-date about the facility the Adrian Center for the Arts occupies now. That building will soon be taken over by folks from PlaneWave. The Arts Center will be moving to two building behind it that have been renovated for their use. One will be their gallery and youth studio.
Melissa Tsuji is a member of the Career Counseling Department at Siena Heights and Jerry Roessler is retired and a veteran member of the Blissfield Rotary Club. They are both board members of the American Farm Museum & Education Center on hand to bring members up to date on the progress made to raise funds for and to create a farm campus in Blissfield. The property is located west of the McDonald’s restaurant in Blissfield off Jefferson Street. It was the former Home Canning Company site.
 
A 9-member board spearheads the organization and Pete Durbin is their CEO and Melissa is their President. Their strategic goals include: creating a unified campus building planned and constructed in stages; becoming a nationally-recognized educational center which will capture the significance of the American farmer and explain their important role in the food production process; construct storage for museum exhibits which includes their 13,000 toy collection, and 315 children pedal tractors, etc. They toys, Melissa said, were gifted to them by the late Charles and Barbara Burkholder valued at over $1M! Once electricity is available in the multi-purpose barn, these items will be moved into it for a small exhibition, she said.
 
Melissa said that they were gifted an 1860’s era barn by the Miller Murbaugh family which was dismantled by an Amish organization the sections of which currently sit in 5 semitrailers in their storage facility. The barn will eventually be re-erected and serve as education space on the campus. The foundation for the building has been poured and the “skeleton will soon start to go up”, she said.
 
Melissa said that there are 4 key areas they will be focusing on: Build, engage, educate, and sustain. The site plan and concept for the campus was developed by renowned architect, Friedrich St. Florian who also designed the WW II memorial in Washington DC! Melissa sat on the committee that helped build the memorial, she said! It was her grandfather, a WWII veteran, who proposed this project back in 1987!
 
Melissa said that the organization is current engaging in fundraising opportunities. The total goal is $20M, Melissa said. The organization has synergistic relationships with both the U of M and MSU and specifically with their museum faculties who are both interested in this project. The Education Center, she said will be THE key component on the campus. It will also serve as a meeting site and high tech facility for “all kinds of interested groups working in the AG industry”, she said. Their Farm to Table dinner events have also helped bring in needed money for the campaign. Melissa said they are currently looking to hire a Director/Fundraiser.
 
She described in detail how our club could help should we wish to donate to a number of projects that need to be completed: They need $28,000 to complete the re-erection of the 1860s barn, $16,000 for their electrical contract, $10,000 for poplar siding and $4,000 for a steel roof. Melissa closed by mentioning their Facebook page and info should we wish additional info at the American Farm Museum and Education Center, P.O. Box 37, Blissfield 49228 and at AFMEC.blissfield@gmail.com
Mark Murray introduced Troy who has been in law enforcement for over 30 years. During his career he has done “some IT stuff” as well, he said. He and his wife, Sandy, have lived in Tecumseh for 23 years. Troy commented on the work being done at the Sheriff’s office on Maple Avenue and said he still attends weekly construction meetings. There will be an official open house once the work is completed sometime in September, he said.
 
He said he was glad to report that there were no major crime sprees going on currently in the county but they have received a number of calls reporting various scams. He said he has many wonderful staff (over 100) and employees and that he is looking forward to serving all of Lenawee County and if there was anything we need, to stop by or call. He closed by encouraging each of us to take time to commend a deputy when we see them as they put their lives on the lines every day to protect us since “it is a scary time to be in this line of work today”.
What are the latest scams? How do the criminals exploit technology to fool us? BBB President Dick Eppstein has witnessed tremendous changes in the way criminals exploit technology to their advantage. He was here today to educate us as consumers so we can avoid being cheated, and BBB’s effort to expose and destroy the crooks who prey on innocent victims every day.
 
Dick is the president of the Better Business Bureau that serves a 24-county area of Northwestern Ohio, Lima and Southeastern Michigan from its offices in Sylvania Township and a Toledo Rotarian.  He is a graduate of the University of Toledo and the Better Business Bureau Institute for Executive Development, Washington, D.C.
 
For over 46 years, Dick has been involved in BBB work.  He is well known as a regular guest on Toledo WTOL-TV (Channel 11), and is also a regular radio personality on several area stations.  The Bureau under his leadership has established a national reputation for innovation, especially in its ethics instruction, charity review and advertising review programs.
 
Among other honors, Dick is a three-time past president of the Ohio Better Business Bureau and has been elected to the Scott High School (Toledo) Hall of Fame.  He belongs to the FBI Citizens Academy, Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, and other professional organizations.
Dick and his wife, Grace, live in Sylvania Township. They are proud parents of two sons; Andrew, Chief of General Surgery at the Roudebush Veterans Administration Hospital in Indianapolis, and Alexander, Pastor at Bethel Reformed Presbyterian Church in Sparta, Illinois. They have four grandchildren.
 
 Here are just a few of the scams Dick shared with us today:
  1. “I’m calling from the IRS.” – These scammers often call from overseas and want you to send them money immediately. The IRS DOES NOT CALL ANYONE DIRECTLY!
  2. “You have won Publishers Clearinghouse.” – They want fees or taxes in advance they say so they can release prize money. DON’T DO IT. It’s a scam.
  3. “Grandma, can you help?” – Scammers disguise themselves as relatives pleading for you to send them money since they are in trouble of some sort. DON’T DO IT!
  4. This is IT service calling.” – These scammer want to access your computer because they say they have noticed a virus or t’s running too slow. DO NOT GIVE THEM ACCESS. It’s a scam!
  5. “You’ve been approved for a government grant.” – These bandits tell victims that, because they have been model citizens and pay their taxes, they have been approved for a grant of thousands of dollars.
Dick cited a number of others and said for more info about these and others to go to www.bbb.org for much more information.
Patrick has helped business leaders and organizations across the country tell their stories. He is the founder and former head of a national marketing firm while having worked with Monster Energy, PBS, Capitol Records, AT&T and a full roster of top artists and other brands.
 
Today, he is a nationally-recognized speaker and marketing influencer as well as the author of numerous articles and three books including “What Customers Love: 10 Ways to Turn Your Customers into Fans and Followers” available on March 30th.
 
Patrick’s presentation focused on engaging with others in a world that has its challenges caused by increased competition, unlimited choices and short attention spans while asking: How do you stand out? How do you tell your story? How do you earn the attention your cause deserves?
 
Patrick, through a series of stories and personal experiences described how to stand out and reach our audiences in a noisy world primarily through the power of stories and personal relationships. His advice to us was: Be Personal, Be Authentic, Help First, and Do it Now.
As you may already know, every incoming president of the Adrian Noon Rotary Club is required to attend this 3-day intensive and informative training event. This year it will again be held in Kalamazoo and our President-Elect, Nelson Douglass, will be in attendance from March 14th to the 16th at the Radisson Plaza Hotel at Kalamazoo Center.
 
The Great Lakes Rotary President-Elect Training Seminar (PETS) is one of the largest multi-district PETS in the United States. It was formed with a view to becoming a premier training event with the atmosphere of a mini Rotary International Convention by leveraging the expertise of six Rotary Districts with clubs in Michigan Indiana, and Ontario.

With the ability to host exceptional speakers, informative workshops, detailed district training sessions, fellowship and networking, the basic purpose of our PETS is to motivate over an anticipated 400 attendees including club presidents-elect, presidents-elect nominee and assistant governors to ensure they are extremely well prepared for their year of service.
 
The Great Lakes Rotary PETS designs the three day conference to truly benefit the attendees providing opportunities to learn about the breadth of Rotary and share ideas with fellow Rotarians and have some fun along with it!

As a six-district president-elect training seminar, Great Lakes Rotary PETS has always attracted engaging, motivating speakers and the best trainers and facilitators from each of the districts. The curriculum is frequently updated so new ideas are presented and discussed. One of the keynote speakers scheduled this year is Mark Daniel Maloney, RI President-Elect.
Bruce Goldsen who will turn the big 6-0 this year and our newest member and a recent transfer from the Adrian Morning Club, gave his member moment today. Bruce said he grew up in Connecticut and started his radio career in 1976 in Wilmington, NC at a “big” radio station WMFD. His first day on the job he hosted their Tradio Show called Swap Shop, he said.
 
He said he met his wife, Sue, while living in Connecticut and going to school there. Bruce said he then went to a station in Tennessee and then in Florida and ended up in Jacksonville when he got a call from a friend who said that there were stations in Jackson that were for sale. So, in 1990, Bruce and Sue moved to Adrian and admitted that they didn’t know anybody so looked for a service club he could join to meet people.
 
He decided to join the Adrian Rotary Club who were meeting at the YMCA at about the time the organization admitted ladies. The Adrian club was quick to admit six. Bruce said it was an excellent move and that we still need to have more diversity. He said he was president in 1997-98 but then transferred to the Jackson Club due to his work with the radio stations there. Two years later he, along with Dave Maxwell and a few other Rotarians decided to start a Morning Club in Adrian which was chartered in 1999.
 
Bruce said that he has been a part of the Radio Industry for many years and very involved in it, too. He served on the 70+ member board of the National Association of Broadcasters as their Michigan representative from 2003-2009. Julie Koehn from WLEN, he said, served from 2009-2015. Bruce is doing another 6 year stint along with serving on their 10 member Executive Committee.
 
On the Rotary side of things, Bruce said that while radio is his vocation, Rotary is his passion. In 1993 he hosted the club’s first Youth Exchange student, Adolfo, from Brazil. Since then, he said, they have hosted his sister, and brother and others totaling seven altogether! They have kept in very close contact with all of them, he said, sharing their excitement when their own children were born who they consider their own grandchildren!
 
Bruce said that they travel extensively around the world with much of it being for Rotary.  They have been to many Rotary International Conventions. They will be attend the one in Hamburg this year, he said. The past 3 years he has been proud to serve on the RI Youth Exchange Committee as well as serving as chair for the Youth Exchange meeting as part of the pre-convention activities. He, of course, has served as District Governor in District 6400 in 2008-09 as did Sue two years ago. They have been part of various service project oversees for Rotary in Ghana, India, and they look forward to their next project “wherever that may be”.
 
They remain very involved in the district with chairing many district conferences including the one coming up.  Bruce said he also had the honor of chairing a Zone Institute for past RI Vice President, Jennifer Jones. There are 39 zones around the world comprised of a certain number of districts made up of local clubs.  
 
When asked if he had any ambitions about becoming a future RI President, he quickly said without hesitation – “NO!”

Downtown Dempsey’s – Tiffany Sieler

Tiffany Sieler (second from left in photo) shared with audience members how appreciative she was to have been chosen an Adrian Noon Club Junior Rotarian and being a past recipient of our club scholarship. She attended Adrian High School and graduated from the U of M and got her Master’s Degree from Columbia University.
 
She said that she went to Florida to complete an internship where she saw some of the abuses of plastic and other refuse in the waterways. She returned to Adrian and is now the General Manager of the new Downtown Dempsey’s restaurant in Downtown Adrian where she has initiated the sustainable dining effort, using as many compostable/ biodegradable items as she can in the restaurant. Her folks, Les and Mary Sieler own Sieler’s Water System and bought the restaurant from Loretta Dempsey ensuring that family recipes got passed along. 
 
Tiffany developed a project called “Dine to Donate” designed to take contributions and distribute to different non-profit each month. When you dine in at Downtown Dempsey's, 10% of your purchase goes to that non-profit being featured for the month. The month of February will be United Way Lenawee/Monroe Counties (inside the Gallery of Shops). The month of March will be Hospice of Lenawee. 
Luke returned to the podium today to speak about this new and “signature” program of the Adrian Noon Rotary Club. The full board last week approved the recommendation to submit a formal proposal to the board of directors of the Adrian Rotary Foundation for $25,000 in support of this important program. A motion to approve was made by Kathryn S. and seconded by Bob Behnke and was passed unanimously! Luke made special mention of State Representative Bronna Kahle’s hand-signed letters she gave him expressing total support of this program!
 
Luke then proceeded to give more details of the program and answered a number of the audience's questions. The basic focus of the program, he said, was to offer PTSD support, allow veterans to use the shop and all of its equipment, receive valuable/marketable education through the classes that are taught and even certification through the state so those who want to pursue a career.
 
Mike Tobey, a fellow club member and veteran himself spoke next saying that he served in Viet Nam and has medical issues from exposure to Agent Orange. He left Viet Nam in 1966 but it wasn’t until 1986 that he was diagnosed with PTSD. He continues therapy to this day. Hollywood and the media, Mike said, need to be quickly corrected when they allege that those veterans suspected of commiting crimes, always attribute it to PTSD. Mike quickly put that to rest and added that it is actually less than 5% of all crimes.
 
PTSD, Mike said, was something that could be addressed through woodworking which not only gives vets something to do but helps them interrelate with one another. “The program can potentially reach out in so many other directions, too.” Mike clarified that alcohol would not be part of this program unlike groups such as the VFW and the American Legion. It is an environment that is less than appropriate for people with PTSD who might have a weakness for alcohol.
 
Nate added that the Brownstown Rotary Club in Brownstown Michigan started an organization called the Victory Gym and was aware of what we’re doing at the workshop and expressed much interest in learning to provide a similar woodworking program at their gym. They said that they would be willing to learn from us and therefore touch even a larger group of vets than are in Lenawee County alone. District Governor Noel Jackson provided a bit more info on what the Brownstown Club was doing.
 
Luke summed everything up by saying that this program will officially launch in May of this year and that every Wednesday the Sam Beauford Workshop will be closed to the public. It will be called Woodworking Warrior Wednesday and run from sun up to sun down. Vets can simply show up and not do anything they want if it's only to enjoy fellowship and coffee with other vets. For others who want more they can embark on official vocational certification. Those who do simply come in and chat could further be encouraged to get involved in woodworking at some level and eventually seek certification, Luke said. There will be scheduled class time for those who would like to participate the workshop's typical 6-week classes, Luke said. Remember – there will be no charge to veterans regardless of their level of involvement.
 
Side note: every member should have received a copy of the full color brochure that was distributed. (Shown at the right).

While “Member Moments” are generally presented by the club’s newest members, longtime member, Rod Hokenson, was invited actually to do our program today…..  He and his wife, Helen, will be leaving the area and the club to begin a new season in their lives,"back to a college dorm” lifestyle (actually The Fountains at Kalamazoo near  oldest son, oldest granddaughter and families).  Rod  is originally from North Dakota, a farm kid during the Depression and Dustbowl, the youngest of 10 children! He said he actually had two lives here in Adrian: the first, 1972-89, as Pastor of Christ Redeemer ELCA church on Maumee -- he admitted trying to cut it short here after 6-8 years,  thinking he had done most of what he could.  But "the Lord,kept pulling on my coattails” and seemed to want him to stay put. So he did, . Then he really got involved in community activities. Rod said he’s really loved Adrian.

His life of 38 years as a Pastor, 17 of them here, he said, was very rewarding; particularly fulfilling in retrospect seems to be in the Copper Country 1964-72, helping two old ethnic churches (Finn and Swede) merge and build new facilities in the face of great economic uncertainty.  After leaving Adrian he ministered in Oak Park MI,  Hammond, IN, Connersville, IN, retiring in 1996. Earlier churches, following College in MN and Seminary in Chicago,  were in WI and MN. “I am not shy to say I have reached age 87” he added.

After  seven years “away" , Rod and Helen decided  to Adrian  for their “second life”, now at  23 years. They are moving to where some of their family lives. That is, however, at the moment  on hold (possibly moreso by the government shutdown and its possible impact on FHA loans). As you know, Rod and Helen started the Great Pasty Project to benefit Habitat for Humanity (Shown at last year's program at left).

Rod then spoke about Rotary and specifically about the first Rotary Show he was in (about 2002 titled “Who Wants to be a Billionaire?”). He was put into a role which even won him the “Cracked Mirror”award for being the "best looking character in drag " playing the coveted role of “Miss Birdsall”! He actually joined Rotary while in Connersville, IN and was recognized “The Most Valuable Rotarian” his very first year as a member! It was Joe Wagley III, Rod said, following his year as president, who invited him to join this club. Joe was starting in real-estate at that time: he helped Rod find their present house, and ironically is again handling its sale. Nate Smith, he said, was his banker back then so it felt like he was truly coming home, he said.

Rod said he joined Rotary because he has a passion for international involvement and to raise the awareness that the US is not the only country in the world. Rod lived in Germany, traveled to India, and “hit another continent in between”. One recent focus was on developing solar power in Africa. Another passion of his, he said, was RI’s GSE program – Group Study Exchange. He shared with the audience an experience he had with Chip Moore who took a group of visitors in the two-engine King Air at the Adrian airport, going over Cedar Point and Detroit and the group “loved it”.  As a private pilot he also took a group from India on an overflight of Lenawee County, apparently their first time in a small plane.

“To sum up my lifetime”, Rod said, he is gratified to still be able to do things and to care for his “beloved wife”. How very grateful he’s been, he said, to be able to grow old together, in sickness and in health. The simple phrase “I love you”, Rod said, has been spoken more often in the past 5 years in their home than ever before! …… In closing Rod wanted to leave a word of wisdom ,  especially to the newer members – “Don’t wait to be asked to do something, be bold, look at yourself and ask ‘what do I have to offer?’ You don’t have to be a Bruce Goldsen, a Mark Murray, or a Nate Smith. Simply volunteer and make clear to the leadership what your interests. abilities and limitations are. Come, then, with what you have to offer and your passions and maybe they will become someone else’s”. “It’s been a pleasure to be a part of this club. I love you all, God Bless You”.

Following Rod’s presentation President Kathy presented him with a maple wooden plaque designed and made by Luke in honor of his 20 plus years of service to the Adrian Noon Rotary Club. ……. Ed note: We’re going to miss you Rod and Helen. God Speed.

Carrie is the Development Director for Habitat and told members that what Habitat does is “all about neighborhood revitalization”. It’s helping people repair homes as well as build them so people have a place to live. Habitat, she said, partnered this year with the Adrian Morning Club and focused on the Parish Park neighborhood in particular. Habitat has campus chapters at both Adrian College and SHU working in construction, working at Habitat’s Restore, volunteering in their office, etc. The students really love helping out, Carrie said.
 
Carrie showed photos of a new home built for the Steffen family. Carrie said it was so nice to talk with the children to ask them what their hopes and dreams were and hearing their responses. One said she was very excited about having her own bedroom she could decorate herself. Another child was just happy about now having a place she could come home to. Their Mother was grateful that she could now give stability to her family.
 
Carrie said that Habitat was even partnering with RI, that they really have similar missions and that they were exploring grant monies that might be available. She showed pictures of the proposed housing plan at the former McKinley School property. She spoke about their Faith Build Program where local churches contribute to their cause. She said that in order to be successful, 15 churches must be involved. These could be small groups at these churches being involved.
 
Carrie announced that The Great Pasty Project will be January 24 and 25. She pointed out that it was our own Rod and Helen Hokenson that started this important program which usually makes about $20,000 a year, involves 300+ volunteers who make over 3,000 pasties! A new Breakfast pasty, she said, will be available this year.
 
Carrie closed by announcing Habitat’s 30th Anniversary Celebration scheduled for February 18th at Adrian College in the Tobias Room.
Luke began by making this statement: “This program is an opportunity for veterans to go to the Sam Beauford Workshop and work for free”! The group’s mission, he said, is: “PROMOTING POSITIVE OUTCOMES FOR VETERANS THROUGH PEER MENTORSHIP AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION”.
 
According to the US Government, he said, only about half of veterans get the help that they need due to such reasons as: many suffer from shame and stigma, the fear of being seen as weak, a lack of understanding about treatment options, concerns over wait time and the inability to travel distances for care. This program, Luke said, will provide them what they need right here in Adrian. These will not be therapy sessions but will go a long way to increase the self-esteem of the men and women who served our country.
 
While we’ve all heard of PTSD (a condition caused generally by a single event), Luke said, CPTSD is a different condition and a bit harder to treat. It is repeated trauma over an extended period of time. Both, he said, can be addressed through woodworking. The program will consist of “Woodworking Wednesdays”. The workshop will be closed to the public those days and be a veterans ONLY day. No classes for the public will be scheduled that day, Luke said.
 
Veterans will be able to come in and choose from several options. One option will allow them to use the machinery to make whatever objects they want with some materials the workshop will provide. There will also be the educational component which will allow veterans to participate in training by skilled instructors. Classes will be offered in guitar making, knife making, etc. There will also be a PTSD support group even though it won’t be called that.
 
The success of the program, Luke said, will be measured in several different ways. A veteran who completes a high quality project will be deemed a success. “These are not your typical popsicle sticks and toilet paper tubes. These are projects that have marketable value in the world.” Veterans will see their accomplishments as meaningful. As participants develop skills on machines, they get vocational certification for doing it through a national accredited organization, Luke said. It will be a real plus for those wanting to get into the woodworking industry long term.
 
Luke shared with the audience the cost involved which was just under $35,000 that would include instructor wages, materials, facility expenses, marketing, tooling & software, and certification fees for up to 20 veterans. Thanks to the equipment the workshop currently has, the costs to launch and run this program have been greatly reduced. This program will seek funding from outside donors as well as from our club who has already confirmed it as a club program. It could very well be our “signature project”!
 
Following our regular meeting a group of members and veterans from the area as well as four who traveled from Big Rapids met to discuss the details.
 
STATEMENT OF PURPOSE

The Adrian Noon Rotary Club is a vibrant, fun, and action-oriented club that is growing their membership and financial capability with strong committed members working towards improving the quality of life within the communities we serve.

Nelson Douglass - Club President